Free Halloween Themed Math Worksheets for Kids

free halloween worksheets

Halloween is just around the corner, and we’ve got the perfect treat to help your early math learner get into the spirit of this year’s spooky season!

Enjoy FREE Halloween-themed math worksheets for your little one, spanning Kindergarten to Grade 2. What better way to help your child prepare for counting their Halloween candy this year?

Download FREE Kindergarten Worksheets

free math worksheets

Download FREE Grade 1 Worksheets

free maths worksheets

Download FREE Grade 2 Worksheets

free math activities for kids

Our free worksheets cover essential early math concepts in a fun and highly engaging way for young learners. There are three sets of worksheets available, covering topics such as addition, number sequence, patterns, time, length, mass, subtraction, word problems, 2D and 3D shapes, data and more.

We hope you enjoy our special Halloween-themed treat with your child this year. Happy learning!

Mathseeds is the fun online mathematics program for children aged 3-6. Your child will work through a sequence of highly engaging online math games and activities designed to build essential early numeracy and problem solving skills.

Claim your free trial of Mathseeds, as well as Reading Eggs, the multi-award winning online reading program for kids.

8 Daily Activities to Teach Your Child to Use Mathematical Language

number talk with toddler

SPECIAL TRIAL OFFER: Start your free trial of Mathseeds today, as well as the multi-award winning online reading program for early learners, Reading Eggs.

Parents usually spend a lot of time talking to their children about letters, sounds and words. This often comes naturally as we sit down to read a book together in the evenings, or point out to words when we’re out and about, such as on billboards and street signs.

But studies show that talking about numbers and using mathematical language with our toddlers is just as important. In fact, many studies suggest that it’s a key predictor of a child succeeding in mathematics when they start school.

Often, parents pay less attention to “number talk” with their children than they do with early literacy concepts. Interestingly, mothers were found to speak to boys about number concepts twice as often as they did with girls.

Parents are encouraged to talk to their toddlers about numbers from an early age, and on a regular basis. Here are eight ways to incorporate number talk into everyday activities to help your child develop an awareness of mathematical language and concepts.

1. Count every day

You can easily turn counting into a fun everyday activity, wherever you go. Count how many birds you spot on an afternoon walk. Or how many red cars you see waiting at the traffic lights. How many chairs are in the doctor’s waiting room, and how many magazines or books? Hold up your fingers when you count and say the numbers out loud. You can even keep a notebook and pen ready to keep a tally.  

2. Have fun solving puzzles

Board games and puzzles are a fun and challenging way to introduce your toddler to mathematical language. Family board games like Chinese Checkers, Chutes and Ladders and Candy Land are all great ways to build your toddler’s understanding of numbers. Every time you roll a dice, read the number out loud and count the squares as you move your playing piece across the board. Puzzles (e.g. wooden shape puzzles) can help toddlers build their shape recognition and understanding of spatial concepts. Encourage your toddler to name different shapes as they play, and tell you if a certain shape is “too big” or “too round” to fit.

3. Pretend play

There is a wealth of educational benefits derived from imaginative play. Your child may enjoy pretending to be a shop keeper, and ask you to purchase items from their “shop”. Or they may like to pretend to be a scientist or a wizard cooking up secret potions in their hidden laboratory. Wherever your child’s imagination takes them, there is sure to be an opportunity to incorporate mathematical language. You can create or buy props for your child, such as play money for shop tills, plastic fruit for pretend groceries, or a simple measuring cup for mixing potions. If they invite you to take part, encourage them to tell you how many fruits they are selling, whether they can give you three of each vegetable, or how much more liquid should go into their secret potion.

4. Sort objects

Encourage your child to observe similarities and differences between objects to classify and sort them into categories. For example, if you’re helping them to put their toys away, ask them to sort all their toys by categories such as “toy cars”, “stuffed animals” or “block shapes”.  You can also do this while tidying. Ask your child to collect objects that need to be put away and sort them into categories (e.g. “paper” or “plastic”). Ask them how many objects they have collected for each group, or to point to a group with a certain number of items. This may even be a good opportunity to use spatial language, such as “put the red cars next to the blue cars”, or “put the small cup inside of the big cup”.

5. Make use of the ruler, measuring tape, and measuring cup

Have fun with your child measuring objects around the house, and reading out or recording measurements. A fun bath time activity involves collecting differently sized jars, cups and containers to teach your child about ‘full’ and ‘empty’, and compare capacities. Talk about what’s happening as you play. For example, “My cup is full, no more water can fit in my cup”, or “Let’s pour water from my small cup to your big cup and see if it becomes full”.

6. Point out numbers wherever you go

Point out numbers on street signs or number plates when you’re sitting in traffic with your child. Point them out and ask them to identify the numbers, or read them out for them yourself. You can also ask your child to show the numbers with their fingers, and encourage them to do this in different ways. For example, showing the number five may involve holding up two fingers on one hand, and three on the other.

7. Online learning resources

Online learning has become a big part of modern day education in the past decade, and technological devices can offer a fun, interactive and valuable early learning tool for toddlers. Many online mathematics resources are designed to be highly engaging and easy to use for preschool-aged children, and introduce them to early learning concepts in a fun and play-based way. Mathseeds is designed to teach children aged 3-6 how to count, identify patterns and shapes, and understand basic problem solving concepts.

8. Be conscious of using “number talk” regularly

Try to solve problems using mathematics in front of your child to help them make connections between mathematics and everyday life. For example, when you’re cooking read aloud each step and measure the quantities accordingly for your child to see. Use numbers when you refer to time, dates, and temperatures. How many hours and minutes until dinner? How many weeks and days until school? Is the temperature going to be higher or lower this weekend?

For more fun mathematics ideas to do with your toddler, read 10 fun ways to build early numeracy skills here.

Mathseeds is the fun online mathematics program for ages 3-6. Children work through a sequence of highly engaging interactive lessons designed to build essential early numeracy and problem solving skills.

SPECIAL TRIAL OFFER: Claim your free trial of Mathseeds today, as well as the multi-award winning online reading program for young children, Reading Eggs.

5 Fun Number Activities for Kids

fun math games

Children can learn basic mathematics skills before starting their first year of school. The best part is it doesn’t need to involve writing tedious mathematics problems on a piece of paper!

Doing mathematics experientially is much more fun for young children. Here are five fun hands-on activities you can do to build your child’s early counting and number skills without them even knowing.

1. Spill the beans

Grab a dozen lima beans and paint one side of the beans with red nail polish or use non-toxic spray paint on a sheet of newspaper. Place 10 beans in a small container or breath mint tin, shake, and spill them on a table. How many beans show up red? How many beans show up white? How many beans in all? Shake again and again to learn all the ways to make sets of ten. Your child can also count the beans, make patterns and explore addition and subtraction.

2. Match the cotton balls

Take one ice cube tray and a bag of cotton balls. Put two cotton balls in the left side of the ice cube tray and ask your child to match it on the other side. They can begin making sets, or use the patterns for addition and subtraction. How many cotton balls in all? Once your child gets the hang of it, use the ice cube tray to teach place value. Make tens on the left side and ones on the right side.

3. Parking lot numbers

If your little one loves everything to do with cars, gather a bunch of toy cars and a single A4 sheet of paper. Draw out parking spaces and label each space with a number from 1 to 10. Say a number and ask your child to place a car in the correct space. If you have several toy cars of different colours, ask them to park a specific car into a specific parking space.

4. Counting with snacks

For a yummy mathematics treat, assemble a pile of your child’s favourite snack. Choose something small, such as jellybeans, gummy bears or raisins. Grab a dice and roll it. Count out the number you landed on. Roll the dice again and add or subtract that number of snacks to or from your snack pile. Repeat this activity until you only have one or two snacks left in the pile.

5. Paint with paper towel rolls

Cut five sheets of A4 paper into quarters so you have 20 evenly sized sheets. Write a number at the top of each page from 1 to 20. Take a sponge and apply a small amount of three different colours of paint (this will be used as a palette). Have your child read the number on each page and then print the correct number of circles by pressing the end of a paper towel roll onto a colour on the sponge. You can make this activity more difficult by focusing on the teen numbers and asking your child to stamp ten times in one colour, then work out how many more to make the teen number using a different colour (e.g. 13 is 10 and 3).

Mathseeds is the fun online mathematics program for ages 3-6. Children work through a sequence of highly engaging interactive lessons designed to build essential early mathematics and problem solving skills.

Visit www.readingeggs.com for your free 14-day trial of Mathseeds and Reading Eggs and let your child experience the fun way of learning mathematics.