10 Fun Holiday Reading Activities for Kids

Holiday Reading Activities for Kids

The holiday season is known to cause a pronounced dip – or ‘slide’ – in children’s reading skills. With an abundance of distractions and a shake-up of routine, getting your child to read over the festive season can be a great challenge as a parent.

But with a bit of thought and preparation, the holidays can actually be the perfect time to enjoy fun and meaningful family activities based around books and reading. Here are some great holiday ideas to keep the magic of reading alive at home.

1. Pair books with day trips – The night before you visit a museum, landmark, or special exhibition, find books and websites to read with your child to help plan your trip together.

2. Create a holiday reading list – Take a trip to the library and put together a list of books your child would like to read during the holidays. Display the list somewhere you’ll see every day, like on the refrigerator, and reward your child with something small each time they check off a new title.

3. Make ‘DEAR’ time fun time – DEAR stands for ‘Drop Everything and Read’, where everybody in the house must drop what they’re doing and read a book. Make it spontaneous and exciting, similar to announcing a special treat!

4. Read to relatives – Encourage your child to show off their new reading skills to grandparents or relatives by reading them a story. Most children love being the focus of attention, and grandparents are usually more than happy to encourage their progress.

5. Follow a recipe – Cooking together is so much fun over the holidays and provides a great opportunity for your child to read out the ingredients and steps. Afterwards, help them write a menu for guests and family members, using as many descriptive words as they can.

6. Create a family book tree – Cut out the shape of a tree from a large sheet of construction paper and invite the whole family to decorate it, adding the words ‘My Family Book Tree’. Hang up your tree near your usual reading area, and as each person reads a book they can write down the title and add a new leaf.

7. Re-enact stories and perform them for relatives – Choose a well-loved story with fun and interesting characters and re-enact it from beginning to end. Prepare some props and perform your story as a family for relatives when they come to visit. Here are some great tips for raising a reader through dramatic play.

8. Start a reading circle with some friends – Host a weekly reading circle at your house and invite your child’s friends and family to join in. They can take turns choosing which books to read together each week.

9. Play fun literacy games on long car trips – If you’re planning a long road trip during the holidays, games like ‘I Spy’ and simple category games can be great for building essential literacy skills. Don’t forget to also stock up on good books for the road!

10. Mix things up with joke books and comic books – Encouraging your child to read a variety of texts is great for setting them up to become lifelong readers. Choose books you know they’ll love and don’t be afraid to experiment with joke books, riddles and comic books, which all offer their own unique benefits to young readers.

Reading Eggs is the multi-award winning online reading program that children love! With hundreds of guided reading lessons, fun games, lovable characters and exciting rewards, inspire your child’s love of reading this holiday with a free trial of Reading Eggs today.

 

Sharing Childhood Reading Memories with Your Children

introduce child to classic literature

“A book is a gift you can open again and again.” — Garrison Keillor

SPECIAL OFFER: Reading Eggs is the online literacy program that makes reading fun for children aged 3-13. You can claim your special FREE trial offer of Reading Eggs here.

We all have those cherished books that made a big impression on us growing up. Many of us look back on them with the hopes to one day share them with our own children, and impart the same values we picked up from their pages.

Sharing your best-loved reading memories is a powerful way to bond with your child, inspire their love of literature from an early age, and create brand new reading memories together.

Here are some tips for sharing your personal literary treasures with your children.

Don’t expect the exact same response – No matter how dearly you hold onto your childhood classics, the truth is that times have changed, and so have children. Your child may simply not share the same passion for your highly prized children’s books, or it may not resonate with them in quite the same way.

If your child isn’t responding to your childhood classics, there’s no shame in not finishing the book. It’s possible that they are just not ready for the themes, language or context of the story. Nevertheless, a great read is still a great, especially if your treasured childhood books include classic literature, such as Anne of Green Gables, Charlotte’s Web or James and the Giant Peach, which brings us to our next point…

Choose quality literature (usually the classics) – Some of your childhood picks might include obscure titles that have stuck with you for a very specific reason. Maybe it was an old paperback you found with your parents at an old discount store, or a lesser known title that appealed to your particular tastes or unique sense of fun (e.g. gags, gore and grossness, which may not be everyone’s cup of tea!)

However, what makes a book a classic is its ability to tell a good story and present a deep understanding of human nature. Classic stories transmit timeless values, exhibit the beauty of language, and spark a sense of wonder and imagination. Books like The Secret Garden, Wind in the Willows and The Ugly Duckling promote universal values that have stood the test of time and continue to make compelling reads for young readers today. Choosing quality literature will increase the chances of your child sharing in the same joys and learnings as you did growing up. Read more tips on how to choose the perfect children’s books for your child.

Talk about the story as you go, and explain things if you need to – Stories from our childhood may use more unfamiliar words, language and themes than usual. Some of it may even be outdated. But this shouldn’t be a big problem. Explain the story as you go, and modify the language if you need to. Once you’re halfway through and your child is used to the style, it won’t be as necessary. If it’s a chapter book, read a chapter at a time, especially for children five and under – short sharp bursts will help them maintain interest. Read some helpful ways to make sure your child is reading for meaning.

Pausing every now and again to talk about the story is also a great way to check your child’s understanding and improve their comprehension skills. Talk to them about how much you enjoyed the book when you were a child, and relate it back to moments in your childhood. You can even show them the original versions if you have them. Don’t worry about going on tangents – the point of sharing these treasures with your child is to create positive reading experiences for them. By turning reading into a fun bonding experience, your child is likely to associate reading with positive memories – a helpful step in learning to read for pleasure.

If it didn’t scare you, it will probably be OK for your child too – A lot of parents worry that some of their best-loved children’s books are too dark. Think Grimm’s Fairy Tales, Lemony Snicket, and even some classic nursery rhymes like Rock-a-bye Baby and Jack and Jill.

Nobody knows your child as well as you do. If you think some of your classic children’s titles will keep them awake over the next few nights, definitely steer clear until they’re older. But generally children can handle a lot more than we give them credit for. Children’s author and teacher Kelly Barnhill summed it up brilliantly when she said, “[Kids] are darker and creepier and far more sinister than anything that you will find on display of a Barnes & Noble … In their imaginations, villains lurk under the stairs, assassins hide behind shower curtains, and tentacled monsters slurp along the basement floor.” If your classic stories appealed more to your sense of curiosity and adventure, rather than fear, chances are it will be the same for your child too.

Save some of the classics for grandparents – We know how much you’d like to share every single one of your childhood classics, but remember that grandparents can play a big role in building your child’s love of reading too. If your child is lucky enough to have grandparents in their life, encourage them to start their own reading traditions together. Have your child’s grandparents introduce special books that are only read when they’re together.

Read together, even if they can read independently – So your little one has already mastered the art of getting lost in a good book. But that doesn’t matter. If your child is already reading independently, it’s still great to set aside some special reading time together every now and then to bond and continue building positive reading experiences with them, even into adolescence if you’re one of the lucky ones. Do bedtime story nights for as long as your child welcomes it and after that, watch movies together based on your best-loved books, or enjoy audio books for long family road trips.

Some classics to get you started

  • The Velveteen Rabbit
  • Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
  • Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp
  • Cinderella
  • Hansel and Grethel
  • Rumpelstiltskin
  • The Emperor’s New Clothes
  • The Frog Prince
  • The Ancient Mariner
  • The Railway Children
  • The Snow Queen
  • The Stonecutter
  • The Travels of Tom Thumb
  • How the Leopard Got Its Spots
  • The Golden Goose

SPECIAL OFFER: Reading Eggs is the online literacy program that makes reading fun for children aged 3-13. The Reading Eggspress Library includes over 2000 children’s e-books, including all of the classic titles listed here. You can claim your special FREE trial offer of Reading Eggs here.

5 Ways to Create a Family Reading Tradition

family reading traditions

Reading together as a family is a great way to encourage your child’s literacy development, build closer bonds, and create beautiful lifelong memories. So whether it’s a regular weekend activity or an annual event that includes the grandparents, here are five ways you can establish a family reading tradition and start creating fond reading memories for you and your child.

1. Establish a dedicated reading area

It doesn’t have to be an entire room – you can establish a regular reading area in an armchair, on the living room sofa, or on top of a couple of beanbags huddled in a corner. Keep your reading area simple and functional, with a few shelves for books, comfortable seats and good lighting. A dedicated reading area for your family will make the reading experience feel comforting and familiar for your child.

2. Choose a regular reading time

Traditions are all about creating regular rituals to engage in again and again. The best way to create a family reading tradition is to do it around the same time, every time, whether it’s daily, weekly or even monthly. You might choose to read together on a family picnic every Sunday during the summer, or first thing in the morning on the first day of each month. Remember, one-on-one reading time should be more regular than those occasions where the whole family sits down to read.

3. Create a family book tree

A family book tree is the perfect way to encourage your family to read together and look forward to reading throughout the week. Take a large sheet of construction paper and cut out the shape of a tree, including some branches. Invite the whole family to decorate the tree with the words ‘My Family Book Tree’, and hang it up on a convenient wall near your usual reading area. As your family reads through different books, add a leaf for every book read.

4. Invite grandparents to create their own traditions

If your child is lucky enough to have grandparents in their life, encourage them to have their own reading traditions together. Have your child’s grandparents introduce special books that are only read when they’re together. Another great idea is to find books that are relevant to your grandparents’ lives. If your child’s grandparent was a gardener, help them find books about gardening, plants or flowers. This provides a great opportunity for bonding, and opens up conversations between your child and their grandparent.

5. Read family classics every holiday

Do you have any books that have become family classics? Choose a meaningful time each year to revisit your best-loved literary treasures with the whole family. Special books can be turned into annual reading traditions for birthdays, Christmases, Halloweens, or even saved as a special surprise for your child’s graduation day.

Reading Eggs is the multi-award winning online reading program that children love. With hundreds of guided reading lessons, fun games, lovable characters and exciting rewards, inspire your child’s love of reading with a free trial of Reading Eggs today.